UMMA: Exhibitions and events for September 2019

Opening exhibitions

NEW AT UMMA: WALTER OLTMANNSEPTEMBER 21–NOVEMBER 17, 2019THE CONNECTOR
Infant Skull II , a woven “tapestry” made out of very fine aluminum wire, only reveals its shape when seen from afar. Drawing inspiration from his country’s basketry traditions, the South African artist Walter Oltmann (b. 1960) alternates densely layered sections with open spaces, allowing the underlying surface of the work to show through. The skull that emerges is, in a South African context, evocative of the Cradle of Humankind—a series of caves outside Johannesburg, where some of the oldest hominin fossils in the world have been found.
The work complements UMMA’s renowned and growing collection of historical and contemporary African art and reminds us of the central role of Africa in the history of humankind.
This acquisition was made possible by the generosity of the UMMA Director’s Acquisition Committee, 2016.

TAKE YOUR PICK: COLLECTING FOUND PHOTOGRAPHSSEPTEMBER 21–JANUARY 5, 2020ARTGYM
Come help build our collection of “ordinary” American 20th-century photographs.
Take Your Pick invites you—the Museum’s visitors—to select photographs for our permanent collection. What belongs in a permanent collection, and why? Who and what should be represented, and how should we decide? This exhibition considers these questions in regard to 1,000 amateur photographs on loan from the private collection of Peter J. Cohen, who has gathered more than 60,000 snapshots while exploring flea markets in the United States and Europe over two decades. The images he has collected depict all aspects of daily life and reveal the dynamic histories of amateur photography. Such pictures have particular significance in the current digital age, when it is much less common to make physical copies of personal photographs. They constitute important artifacts of twentieth-century visual culture and precedents for the photographs we still make today. You are invited to make your voice heard in the selection process by voting for the photographs that resonate most with you!  
Vote for your favorite pictures: Saturday, September 21 – Sunday, December 1, 2019Final selections on view: Tuesday, December 3, 2019 – Sunday, January 5, 2020
Support for this exhibition is provided by P.J. and Julie Solit and the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and Department of Film, Television, and Media.

PAN-AFRICAN PULP: A COMMISSION BY MELEKO MOKGOSIWATCH THE INSTALLATION AUGUST 26–SEPTEMBER 22, 2019ON VIEW SEPTEMBER 22–FALL 2021VERTICAL GALLERY
In Pan-African Pulp , Botswana-born artist Meleko Mokgosi explores the history of Pan-Africanism, the global movement to unite ethnic groups of sub-Saharan African descent. His Vertical Gallery installation, which inaugurates a new biennial commission program at UMMA, features large-scale panels inspired by African photo novels of the 1960s and ’70s, a mural examining the complexity of blackness, posters from Pan-African movements from around the world, including those founded in Detroit and Africa in the 1960s, and stories from Setswana literature. Pan-African Pulp vividly connects to Detroit’s deep history of activism, where organizations such as Black Nation of Islam, The Republic of New Afrika, Shrine of the Black Madonna (Black Christian Nationalism), Pan-African Congress, and United Negro Improvement Association were founded. The renewed urgency for diversity and civil rights in Detroit, and the country as a whole, heightens the relevance of Mokgosi’s project and reveals the deep connections between these historical movements and those developing today.
Lead support is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan African Studies Center.

Continuing Exhibitions

JASON DEMARTE: GARDEN OF ARTIFICIAL DELIGHTSTHROUGH SEPTEMBER 1, 2019MEDIA GALLERY
Jason DeMarte: Garden of Artificial Delights  presents an enigmatic world filled with unexpected and unsettling sensory temptations. In this immersive installation of photographs and wallpaper, Michigan-based photographer Jason DeMarte weaves together detailed images of fauna (birds, caterpillars, and moths) and flora (local plants and flowers). Each scene is set against ominous cloudy skies, which rain melted ice cream, whipped topping, candies, and glossy paint. Overburdened with decorations, the flowers and plants begin to decay, leaving the birds and insects unable to survive for long in this overly sweet environment. DeMarte’s illusionistic landscapes recall the long tradition of still life painting in Europe and America, and a rich history of fantasy environments represented in literature and film—from Alice’s Wonderland to Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. Yet, his images decidedly foreground the complicated visual circumstances of our contemporary moment and provoke us to consider this imagined and oversaturated world as analogous to our own.
Support for this exhibition is provided by P.J. and Julie Solit, Amelia and Eliot Relles, and the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment.

NEW AT UMMA: FOUR WORKS BY EGON SCHIELETHROUGH SEPTEMBER 15, 2019THE CONNECTOR
Egon Schiele (1890-1918), one of the most well-known and controversial figures of Austrian Expressionism, made more than 3,000 works over the span of his short life and career. Working at the turn of the twentieth century, Schiele challenged the classical conventions of the day producing emotionally charged—often unsettling—drawings and watercolors depicting landscapes, portraits, and nudes. Two retired U-M professors recently gifted four works of art by Schiele to UMMA. Throughout their lifetimes, Frances McSparran (English language and literature) and the late Ernst Pulgram (Romance and classical linguistics) collected over forty Austrian and German Expressionist works, donating many of them to the Museum. The three watercolors and one drawing on view in this special installation complement the couple’s previous gifts of works by Schiele and his contemporaries Oskar Kokoschka, George Grosz, and Gustav Klimt, reuniting these important works that together provide important insights into this tumultuous period in European history.     
CEAL FLOYER: THINGSTHROUGH SEPTEMBER 22, 2019IRVING STENN, JR. FAMILY GALLERY
Visitors entering Floyer’s installation  Things  (2009) in the Irving Stenn, Jr. Family Gallery encounter a collection of identical plinths that would ordinarily be used to display art objects in the Museum, but these platforms are empty. In place of visible objects, each plinth is equipped with a speaker from which we hear the word “thing” sung—edited out of and isolated from a range of pop songs. The result is an amusing and thoughtful exploration of language, meaning, and the conventions of museum presentation and spectatorship.
The installation, like much of Berlin-based artist Ceal Floyer’s art, is characteristically austere, but its visual simplicity masks a more complicated message—often a wry cerebral twist the artist creates through language-based symbols and aesthetic devices. Floyer’s work is rooted in conceptual art, in which the idea, delivered through words or acts that undercut or supersede formal qualities, is the essence of the artwork.
Lead support is provided by the University of Michigan College of Engineering and the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design, Institute for the Humanities, CEW+ Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund, and School of Music, Theatre & Dance.

THE POWER FAMILY PROGRAM FOR INUIT ART: TILLIRNANNGITTUQTHROUGH OCTOBER 27, 2019SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS GALLERY
Two fascinating stories converge in one very special exhibition: One tracks the development and subsequent worldwide acclaim of contemporary Inuit art from the Canadian Arctic. The other traces the Power family’s seminal role in supporting Inuit art and introducing it to a U.S. audience. Seventy years ago, neither the Inuit artists nor the Power family could have foreseen the tremendous popularity that this work would come to enjoy. Taking its title from the Inuktitut word for “unexpected,” this stirring exhibition showcases 58 works from the collection of Philip and Kathy Power, most from the very early contemporary period of the 1950s and 60s. Included are exquisite sculptures of ivory, bone, and stone, as well as stonecut and stencil prints, some from the first annual Inuit print collection in 1959. Among the renowned Inuit artists featured in this historic survey are Kanaginak Pootoogook, Kenojuak Ashevak, Lucy Qinnuayuak, Niviaksiak, Osuitok Ipeelee and Johnny Inukpuk.
The exhibition also serves as a promising launch pad for future groundbreaking research, exhibitions, and programming related to Inuit art and culture at the University of Michigan, thanks to the generosity of the Power family.
This exhibition inaugurates the Power Family Program for Inuit Art, established in 2018 through the generosity of Philip and Kathy Power.

COPIES AND INVENTION IN EAST ASIATHROUGH JANUARY 5, 2020A. ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY I
Far from being frowned upon as uncreative, in China, Korea, and Japan, copying has long been considered a valuable practice. Through works of art spanning ancient to contemporary times, Copies and Invention in East Asia  challenges our understanding of originality, and presents copying as an act of imaginative interpretation. The exhibition includes burial goods that conjure a world for the deceased; Buddhist sculptures produced in multiples to amplify religious experience and meaning; paintings in which a master’s brushstrokes are faithfully duplicated as a way of shaping the self; and contemporary works that address multiplicity and duplication in the modern world.
Lead support for this exhibition is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Nam Center for Korean Studies, and College of Engineering. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Fabrication Studio at the Duderstadt Center, the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, and SeeMeCNC 3D Printers.
ABSTRACTION, COLOR, AND POLITICS: THE 1960s AND 1970sTHROUGH FALL 2020A. ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY II
In the midst of the political and cultural upheavals of the ’60s and ’70s, artists, critics, and the public grappled with the relationship between art, politics, race, and feminism. During these decades, the notion that abstraction was a purely formal and American art form, concerned only with timeless themes disconnected from the present, was met with increased skepticism. Women artists and artists of color began to actively and assertively explore abstraction’s possibilities. The artworks in  Abstraction, Color, and Politics: The 1960s and 1970s   demonstrate both radical and disarming changes in how artists worked and what they thought their art was about. Their new formal and intellectual strategies—seen here across large-scale and miniature work—dramatically transformed the practice of abstraction in the 1960s and 1970s in a politically shifting American landscape.
UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support:Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the ArtsExhibition Endowment Donors: Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller FundUniversity of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

COLLECTION ENSEMBLEONGOINGMUSEUM APSE
Collection Ensemble presents the first major reinstallation of UMMA’s iconic entry space in over a decade. It exchanges Alumni Memorial Hall’s previous focus on European and American painting for a broad mix of American, European, African, and Asian art from across media sampling the Museum’s remarkable, disparate holdings. The installation is organized into thematic and formal vignettes that respond to the concepts and ideas resonating from an extraordinary large-scale photograph of a vacant cathedral by contemporary German artist Candida Höfer. Featuring works of art by forty-one famous and not-so-famous artists, many of them artists of color and women—including Charles Alston, Khaled al-Saa’i, Norio Azuma, Christo, Theaster Gates, Jenny Holzer, Roni Horn, Dinh Q. Lê, Kara Walker, and others, Collection Ensemble reimagines the collection not as a fixed entity with one set of meanings to be unearthed, but instead as an active, creative, sometimes startling source of material and ideas, open for debate and interpretation.

Guided Exhibitions and Gallery Tours

BOLTANSKI, MONUMENT TO THE LYCÉE CHASESSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 82–3 p.m.MEET AT UMMA SHOP
Christian Boltanski was born in Paris in the wake of its liberation from Fascist control. Perhaps as a result of his childhood experiences, he has explored themes of memory, death, and mourning in a variety of media—film, paint, photography, and found objects. His evocative, often ephemeral installations archive and memorialize anonymous individual loss. Monument to the Lycée Chasesis part of a series of works Boltanski began in 1987, inspired by a found photograph of the 1931 graduating class from a private Jewish high school in Vienna, Austria. His re-photographed images are mere silhouettes or intimations of corporal presences that together comprise a moving meditation on loss and endurance.

COLLECTION ENSEMBLESUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 152–3 p.m.MEET AT UMMA SHOP
The reinstallation of UMMA’s Apse, Collection Ensemble , highlights the breadth and variety of the Museum’s collection and juxtaposes works of art from different artists, periods, areas, and media. The installation is organized around a very large photograph of a Baroque church by Candida Höfer. From this centerpiece, the works of art are grouped in scenes or distinctive vignettes comprised of a broad mix of American, European, African, and Asian art from across media. The reinstallation doesn’t adhere to either chronological or geographic boundaries. Vera Grant, UMMA’s Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, and curator of this installation, says: “The exhibition recasts the role of the collection as an active, creative, sometimes startling source of material and ideas, open for debate and interpretation. The arrangements remind us that works of art can change in meaning and affect when placed in new contexts.” Join an UMMA docent to explore and interpret this exciting new project.

THE POWER FAMILY PROGRAM FOR INUIT ART: TILLIRNANNGITTUQSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 222–3 p.m.MEET AT UMMA SHOP
In celebration of UMMA’s new Power Family Program for Inuit Art , the Museum presents a special exhibition of two incredible, intertwining stories. One traces the development of contemporary Inuit art in the Canadian Arctic from the 1950s to the present. The other relates the fascinating story of the Power family’s important role in supporting and promoting Inuit art from the outset, bringing public attention to its artistic strength and cultural importance. The Power family’s collection is unusual in its strong representation of early contemporary carvings, incised drawings on ivory and antler, soapstone sculptures, and prints that evolved as Inuit artists developed their own artistic voices and responded creatively to their changing world. 
This exhibition inaugurates the Power Family Program for Inuit Art, established in 2018 through the generosity of Philip and Kathy Power.

COPIES AND INVENTION IN EAST ASIASUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 292–3 p.m.MEET AT UMMA SHOP
Far from being frowned upon as uncreative, in China, Korea, and Japan, copying has long been considered a valuable practice. Through works of art spanning ancient to contemporary times, Copies and Invention in East Asia  challenges our understanding of originality, and presents copying as an act of imaginative interpretation. The exhibition includes burial goods that conjure a world for the deceased; Buddhist sculptures produced in multiples to amplify religious experience and meaning; paintings in which a master’s brushstrokes are faithfully duplicated as a way of shaping the self; and contemporary works that address multiplicity and duplication in the modern world. A museum docent will interpret the complex ways that Asian artists have produced multiple artworks through time.
Lead support for this exhibition is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Nam Center for Korean Studies, and College of Engineering. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Fabrication Studio at the Duderstadt Center, the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, and SeeMeCNC 3D Printers.

UMMA Programs and Events

UMMA BOOK CLUB: ART, IDEAS, & POLITICSTHURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1212–1 p.m.A. ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY I
UMMA’s exploration of abstract art, politics, and identity continues with  Abstraction, Color, and Politics: The 1960s and 1970s.  Join UMMA and Literati Bookstore for the Art, Ideas & Politics Book Club which will include texts relevant to abstract art as well as the immense social changes of the period. Surrounded by the artworks by Howardena Pindell, John T. Scott, Richard Hunt, Helen Frankenthaler, and Louise Nevelson, we will read and discuss bold and critical voices—both fiction and nonfiction—guided by Literati Bookstore’s Creative Programs Manager, Gina Balibrera Amyx. The September meeting’s book is  How We Get Free , edited by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor.
UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support:Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the ArtsExhibition Endowment Donors: Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller FundUniversity of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

OPEN OFFICE HOURS WITH DIRECTOR CHRISTINA OLSENTHURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1212–1 p.m.LIVING ROOM
Back by popular demand! UMMA Director Christina Olsen wants to chat with you about the Museum. Come say hello, share your reactions to recent exhibitions and changes, and bring your ideas of what you’d like to see at UMMA. Meet Tina in the new, comfortable UMMA Living Rooms in Alumni Memorial Hall.

ZELL VISITING WRITERS SERIES: GALA MUKOMOLOVA, POETRY READINGTHURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 125:30–6:30 p.m.HELMUT STERN AUDITORIUM
Gala Mukomolova’s full-length poetry book, Without Protection (Coffee House Press 2019), explores her complex identity―Jewish, post-Soviet, refugee, New Yorker, lesbian― through a Russian fable.
Mukomolova is a Moscow-born, Brooklyn-raised poet and essayist. She is the author of the chapbook One Above One Below: Positions and Lamentations (YesYes Books 2018). She received her MFA from the Helen Zell Writers’ Program at the University of Michigan. Her past residencies include Vermont Studio Center, Six Points Fellowship for Emerging Jewish Artists and The Pink Door. Her poems and essays have appeared in Poetry , PEN American , PANK and elsewhere. She writes articles on astrology for NYLON and is cohost of the podcast Big Dyke Energy.
UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from U-M alumna Helen Zell (AB ’64, LLDHon ’13). For more information, please visit the Zell Visiting Writers Series webpage .

OPEN OFFICE HOURS WITH DIRECTOR CHRISTINA OLSENFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 133–4 p.m.LIVING ROOM
Back by popular demand! UMMA Director Christina Olsen wants to chat with you about the Museum. Come say hello, share your reactions to recent exhibitions and changes, and bring your ideas of what you’d like to see at UMMA. Meet Tina in the new, comfortable UMMA Living Rooms in Alumni Memorial Hall.

IN CONVERSATION: COPIES AND MULTIPLICATIONS IN BUDDHISMSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 153–4 p.m.A. ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY I
This program is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  Click here to register .
The act of producing copies has a special meaning in Buddhism. From simply reciting and rewriting Buddha’s teachings to creating multiple images of sacred Buddhist figures, objects and texts, or the commissioning of one million pagodas, copying served to increase karmic merit—​guaranteeing a better afterlife and eventually leading to enlightenment. In this conversation, Kevin Carr, Associate Professor of Japanese Art History at University of Michigan and specialist of Buddhist art, and Natsu Oyobe, UMMA Curator of Asian Art, will illuminate the significance of copies in Buddhist religious practices, and guide us through Buddhist art objects featured in the current UMMA exhibition Copies and Invention in East Asia. 
Lead support for this exhibition is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Nam Center for Korean Studies, and College of Engineering. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Fabrication Studio at the Duderstadt Center, the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, and SeeMeCNC 3D Printers.

OPEN OFFICE HOURS WITH DIRECTOR CHRISTINA OLSENTHURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1912–1 p.m.LIVING ROOM
Back by popular demand! UMMA Director Christina Olsen wants to chat with you about the Museum. Come say hello, share your reactions to recent exhibitions and changes, and bring your ideas of what you’d like to see at UMMA. Meet Tina in the new, comfortable UMMA Living Rooms in Alumni Memorial Hall.

ZELL VISITING WRITERS SERIES: WAYÉTU MOORE, FICTION READINGTHURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 195:30–6:30 p.m.HELMUT STERN AUDITORIUM
Wayétu Moore’s debut novel She Would Be King reimagines the dramatic story of Liberia’s early years. It was named a best book of 2018 by Publishers Weekly, Booklist, Entertainment Weekly & BuzzFeed. 
Moore is the founder of One Moore Book, a non-profit organization that creates and distributes culturally relevant books for underrepresented readers. Her first bookstore opened in Monrovia, Liberia in 2015. Her writing can be found in The Paris Review, Frieze Magazine, Guernica, The Atlantic Magazine and other publications. She has been featured in The Economist Magazine, NPR, NBC, BET and ABC, among others, for her work in advocacy for diversity in children’s literature. She is a graduate of Howard University, University of Southern California and Columbia University. Moore is a founding faculty member of Randolph College MFA program and a Distinguished Visiting Writer at Syracuse University.  
UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from U-M alumna Helen Zell (AB ’64, LLDHon ’13). For more information, please visit the Zell Visiting Writers Series webpage .

OPEN OFFICE HOURS WITH DIRECTOR CHRISTINA OLSENFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 203–4 p.m.LIVING ROOM
Back by popular demand! UMMA Director Christina Olsen wants to chat with you about the Museum. Come say hello, share your reactions to recent exhibitions and changes, and bring your ideas of what you’d like to see at UMMA. Meet Tina in the new, comfortable UMMA Living Rooms in Alumni Memorial Hall.

STORYTIME AT THE MUSEUMSATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2111:15 a.m.–12 p.m.MEET AT UMMA SHOP
Storytime at the Museum promotes art enjoyment for our youngest patrons. We read a story in the galleries and include a fun, age-appropriate, hands-on activity related to it. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet in front of the UMMA Shop.
Storytime is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

PENNY STAMPS SPEAKER SERIES SPECIAL EVENT: MELEKO MOKGOSI,PAN-AFRICAN PULPSATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 217:30–8:30 p.m.HELMUT STERN AUDITORIUM
For his UMMA commission, Botswana-born artist Meleko Mokgosi explores the history of Pan-Africanism, the global movement to unite ethnic groups of sub-Saharan African descent. Entitled Pan-African Pulp , the exhibition features large-scale panels inspired by African photo novels of the 1960s and ’70s, a mural examining the complexity of blackness, posters from Pan-African movements founded in Detroit and Africa in the 1960s, and stories from Setswana literature.
Meleko Mokgosi is an artist, and an associate professor in painting and printmaking at The Yale School of Art. By working across history painting, cinematic tropes, psychoanalysis, and post-colonial theory, Mokgosi creates large-scale project-based installations that interrogate narrative tropes and the fundamental models for the inscription and transmission of history. His artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally at venues including the Botswana National Gallery, The Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, The Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Culture Center, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art, Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, Rochester Contemporary Art Center, The University of Rochester’s Memorial Art Gallery, Williams College Museum of Art, The Fowler Museum at UCLA, and the Baltimore Museum of Art.

UMMA AFTER HOURS: FALL OPENINGSATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 217–10 p.m.WHOLE MUSEUM
Join us to celebrate an exciting new season at UMMA! Enjoy live music, gallery talks, artmaking, food, and more at this free community event.
Painter and printmaker Meleko Mokgosi’s newly commissioned work,  Pan-African Pulp , transforms UMMA’s Vertical Gallery into a multimedia exploration of the history of global Pan-Africanism, a movement with significant history in Detroit. Mokgosi will give a talk at 7:30 p.m. in the Auditorium.
This fall, UMMA launches a new experimental space, ArtGym, with  Take Your Pick: Collecting Found Photographs . Cast your vote and be part of our crowdsourcing experiment to choose the 250 photographs UMMA will add to our permanent collection.
Copies and Invention in East Asia , in our Taubman Gallery, will challenge your understanding of originality and delight you with an exploration of Japanese, Chinese, and Korean art spanning ancient to contemporary times.
We look forward to seeing you there! UMMA events are generously sponsored by Fidelity Investments. The media sponsor for UMMA After Hours is the Ann Arbor Observer.

FILM SCREENING: KINNGAIT: RIDING LIGHT INTO THE WORLDSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2212:40 p.m.–1:45 p.m.HELMUT STERN AUDITORIUMA first hand account of how the isolated Inuit community of Kinngait became the internationally celebrated art capital of the North.
A portrait of the Kinngait Studios celebrating its 50th year of continuous successful operation; the film introduces the remarkable artists who overcame cultural barriers and the hardships of a harsh environment to give birth to a vivid new expression of Inuit life. It tells of how the tiny, isolated community of Kinngait (Cape Dorset), against all odds, turned the making of art into a multimillion dollar co-operative business run by the Inuit townsfolk. Richly illustrated with the work of successive generations of Kinngait artists expressing the immense changes experienced by Inuit to their way of life and environment over the past half-century.Directed by Annette Mangaard65 min | Canada (2010)Watch the trailer
On the occasion of the UMMA exhibition  The Power Family Program for Inuit Art: Tillirnanngittuq, UMMA invites you to enjoy a selection of documentary and fictional films about Inuit culture. Sundays, September 22 and October 27: Film screenings at 12:40 and 3:15 p.m; guided exhibition tours 2-3 p.m.This exhibition inaugurates the Power Family Program for Inuit Art, established in 2018 through the generosity of Philip and Kathy Power.

FILM SCREENING: MALIGUTIT (SEARCHERS)SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 223:15–4:50 p.m.HELMUT STERN AUDITORIUM
Inspired by John Ford’s, The Searchers ,  Maliglutit  is a story about a man who embarks on a perilous mission across the tundra in search of his kidnapped wife and daughter. In telling this western classic from an indigenous perspective, directors Zacharias Kunuk and Natar Ungalaaq, craft a stirring epic that explores community, revenge, and the meaning of justice. This film includes a score by award-winning Inuit throat singer, Tanya Tagaq.
Directed by Zacharias Kunuk, Nata Ungalaaq (co-director)94 min | Canada (2016)Watch the trailer
On the occasion of the UMMA exhibition  The Power Family Program for Inuit Art: Tillirnanngittuq, UMMA invites you to enjoy a selection of documentary and fictional films about Inuit culture. Sundays, September 22 and October 27: Film screenings at 12:40 and 3:15 p.m; guided exhibition tours 2-3 p.m.This exhibition inaugurates the Power Family Program for Inuit Art, established in 2018 through the generosity of Philip and Kathy Power.

OPEN OFFICE HOURS WITH DIRECTOR CHRISTINA OLSENTHURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2612–1 p.m.LIVING ROOM
Back by popular demand! UMMA Director Christina Olsen wants to chat with you about the Museum. Come say hello, share your reactions to recent exhibitions and changes, and bring your ideas of what you’d like to see at UMMA. Meet Tina in the new, comfortable UMMA Living Rooms in Alumni Memorial Hall.

OPEN OFFICE HOURS WITH DIRECTOR CHRISTINA OLSENFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 273–4 p.m.LIVING ROOM
Back by popular demand! UMMA Director Christina Olsen wants to chat with you about the Museum. Come say hello, share your reactions to recent exhibitions and changes, and bring your ideas of what you’d like to see at UMMA. Meet Tina in the new, comfortable UMMA Living Rooms in Alumni Memorial Hall.

MARK WEBSTER READING SERIESFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 277–8 p.m.HELMUT STERN AUDITORIUM
One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends–a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening. 
This week’s reading features Carl Lavigne and Ian Burnette. Carl Lavigne is from Georgia, Vermont. He lies for a living. Ian Burnette is a poet from South Carolina via Ohio.